Why I Love My Bank — PPP Success Stories

Texas banks have long been the economic engines of their communities. During the COVID-19 crisis, however, they have led the way in helping small business owners and the working families they employ. Through June 27, Small Business Administration figures show that Texas made 382,408 approved loans totaling more than $40.8 billion.

But Texas community bankers know that it is not about the statistics or data. It is about helping small business owners and the working families they employ. In large communities and small, the human impact made by Texas banks cannot be understated.

In the videos below, business owners tell the story of how their partnerships with community banks helped save their small businesses during this critical time. — Strong Banks. Stronger Communities.

BANK CUSTOMERS TELL THEIR STORIES

Golden Bank, Houston

National Bank & Trust, La Grange

Industry State Bank

First State Bank Louise

Mineola Community Bank

Industry State Bank

First National Bank of Gilmer

Alliance Bank Central Texas

Castroville State Bank

First State Bank Gainesville

Unity National Bank

Guaranty Bank

Allegiance Bank

Amarillo National Bank

Brady National Bank

First National Bank of Bosque County

Moody Bank

WestStar Bank of El Paso

Texas Citizens Bank

Golden Bank, Houston

Jim Wang, owner of Jinya Ramen Bar in Houston can cook a really good bowl of ramen, but if you give him a stack of paperwork to complete, he's a little bit lost. Not a problem: Grace Lin, EVP of Golden Bank, reached out to Jim when PPP loans became available and walked him through every step of the process. In just two months, Golden Bank has processed more than 1,000 PPP loan applications.


TEXAS BANKS 4 FOOD BANKS PROGRAM

Texas community banks, through the Texas Bankers Association and its charitable arm, the Texas Bankers Foundation, partnered with Feeding Texas to launch the Texas Banks 4 Food Banks program during the COVID-19 emergency. The Foundation contributed a total of $26,000 to the Feeding Texas network of 21 food banks that serve all 254 Texas counties, and banks will be amplifying the program with additional donations and advocacy for the food banks. To date, Texas banks have contributed more than $500,000 to the Feeding Texas Network through the Texas Banks 4 Food Banks Program.

“Community bankers know the needs of their neighbors and we recognize the overwhelming demand Texas food banks are experiencing and the difficulty of keeping their shelves stocked,” said Texas Bankers Association CEO Chris Furlow. “We have been inspired by the incredible efforts of the Feeding Texas network and this is why TBA is proud to partner with them.”

“We are grateful to the Texas Bankers Association for their support of Texas food banks,” said CEO Celia Cole. “The Texas Banks 4 Food Banks initiative will help food banks meet the urgent needs in their communities during this unprecedented health and economic crisis.”

In an effort to save local jobs, Texas community banks have led the nation in processing more than 204,762 Paycheck Protection Program loans totaling over $13.8 billion for small businesses while continuing to support individual customers in a variety of ways throughout the crisis.

“Whether it is putting food on the table by helping to preserve jobs or literally helping to put food on the table in partnership with Feeding Texas, our banks are committed to helping our fellow Texans during the pandemic,” Furlow said Texas banks and the Texas Bankers Foundation have a history of giving back to their communities during disasters, such as Hurricane Harvey, tornadoes, fires, and man-made disasters. The Foundation also makes contributions to military organizations, 4-H and Future Farmers of America, to name a few.


ABOUT THE TEXAS BANKERS ASSOCIATION

Founded in 1885, the Texas Bankers Association is a member-centric state organization based in Austin whose members represent the voice of the banking industry within the state and national halls of Austin and Washington, D.C.

In addition, our members engage in discussions impacting industry safety and soundness and economic issues affecting their customers.

TBA is the Leadership Organization & Principal Advocate For All Texas Banks

TBA represents 95 percent of banking institutions of all asset and deposit sizes. Our membership includes small and large institutions holding state and national charters, thrift charters and non-Texas charters with thousands of branches across our state.

Our member institutions pay local taxes on brick and mortar buildings and employ nearly 150,000 banking professionals. Members speak individually and through their representation on the association’s board of directors, four councils and 16 committees. More than 300 members volunteer each year to speak to TBA’s mission of one industry, one vision, one voice.

Financial Education

TBA publishes many resources on financial literacy available to bankers for career fairs and to educators for teaching money management in the classroom. TBA also offers tips for consumers on protecting against fraud and provides scholarships to future bankers.

Best-In-Class Banker Education

TBA learning never stops. We provide more than 75 seminars, 200 webinars and 20 specialized conferences and schools for over 8,000 Texas bankers each year. We prepare banking leaders for tomorrow through our Management Development Program.

Facts & Stats

Representing all Texas banking institutions, the Texas Bankers Association brings together community and regional banks and branches, bank holding companies and savings institutions.

  • The Texas Bankers Association has about 420 member banks and 4,545 branches, representing 95 percent of Texas banking institutions of all asset and deposit sizes.
  • The overwhelming majority of TBA members are community banks: the small and family-owned businesses that enable and support other small and family-owned businesses in Texas.
  • Located in Austin, the association is governed by a board of directors representing member banks of all asset sizes from across the state.